Monthly Archives: December 2012

Mere Inkling

nativity iconMerry Christmas!

One of the sad things about living in a secular nation is that people understand very little about the real meaning of Christmas. For example, many people take their trees down on 26 December, mistakenly thinking Christmas is “over.” In reality, the Christian celebration of the Nativity of Jesus only begins on Christmas Day!

The commercial world celebrates the season of Advent and deceptively calls it “Christmas.” These weeks, which should mark a spiritual preparation akin to Lent, are instead transformed into a frantic race to accumulate the perfect gifts to show others just how much we value each of them. And, since we love our family and close friends, there is a constant temptation to be far more extravagant in our gift giving than we can afford.

Returning to the season of Christmas, in which we find ourselves this day . . . we discover a brief…

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Why the world didn’t end December 21, 2012

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Hot Coffe (film)

Website: http://www.hotcoffeethemovie.com/

“Hot Coffee is a 2011 documentary film that analyzes and discusses the impact of tort reform on the United States judicial system. It is directed by Susan Saladoff, who has practiced as a medical malpractice attorney for at least 26 years. The film premiered at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival on January 24, 2011 and later aired on HBO on June 27, 2011 as a part of HBO films documentary summer series. The title is derived from the Liebeck v. McDonald’s Restaurants lawsuit in which the plaintiff Liebeck was severely burned after spilling hot coffee purchased from a McDonald’s into her lap.

Cases discussed

Hot Coffee discusses several cases and relates each to tort reform in the United States:

  1. Liebeck v. McDonald’s Restaurants and public relations campaigns (i.e. how the case was publicized to instigate tort reform)
  2. Colin Gourley’s malpractice lawsuit and caps on damages

  3. Prosecution of Mississippi Justice Oliver Diaz and judicial elections (i.e. how judges were elected for their positive stance on tort reform, reflecting election campaign contributions)

  4. Jamie Leigh Jones v. Halliburton Co. doing business as KBR and mandatory arbitration.”

(via Wikipedia)

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