Category Archives: Time

Daylight Saving Time Explained

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Time

What is a Leap Year?

Note: This video answers the question I raised here, through “Actually, the moment of Earth’s revolution (the spin around the Sun) lasts 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes and 9 seconds. The reason why terrans gave the calendaristic year a round number is of practical nature. Still, from the same practical reasons, because of those six additional hours, the day of 29 february is added. I don’t know where the 9 minutes and 9 seconds go….: every 100 years, the first year of the new century (ex: 1800, 1900, 2000, 2100), despite being a leap year, doesn’t receive an additional day in February (the 29th day).

1 Comment

Filed under Astronomy, Earth, Time

The Ion Luca Paradox: the mystery of Caragiale’s birth date

I love you as the sclave loves…. light and the blind…. liberty!” – Rică Venturiano, a very confused citizen (character from a famous play of I.L.Caragiale, “O Scrisoare Pierdută” [“A Lost Letter”])

Yesterday, 30 January 2012, Google celebrated 160 years from the birth of Ion Luca Caragiale, a famous romanian playwright best known for his satirical humor. 

The problem is that Wikipedia, champion of knowledge, had let us totally perplex by providind 4 different dates of birth for Ion Luca Caragiale, two by old style (the Julian Calendar), and other two by new style (the Gregorian Calendar). At that interval of time (1800 – 1900), there was a difference of 12 correction days between the two calendars. 

So, the four dates of birth are 18 January (O.S.), 30 January (N.S.), 1 February (O.S.), 13 February (N.S.). But which is correct? Searching deeper into the problem, I found that: 

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Time

Comparison between Mark Twain’s times and ours

In our times, we have access to practically an infinite amount of information, we can communicate with nearly every person on the planet with relative ease and go from a continent to another in a matter of hours. 

In Mark Twain’s times, the majority of things a person would know during his lifetime was assimilated during school, there were few books to read (in comparison to the present), journeys took very long (the principal means of transport were the steam train and the steam boat) and people communicated slow and hard, mostly by letters.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Time

Shreds of Time

"Clock time" by Salvador Dali

Time… why does it have to move always forward, never behind? We never have enough ot it lately: I don’t know when we progressed into a world of speed, but just as we made this jump, everything began to move faster: information, cars, people, even the clock seems to be ticking faster.

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Time